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UNO press seeks submissions for an online anthology of online post-Katrina writing

Panelists at the first Rising Tide conference, in 2006, which brought together bloggers and other tech-savvy citizens to discuss the role of the Internet in the rebuilding and future of New Orleans. From left: Dedra Johnson, name forgotten, Greg Peters, Scout Prime, and Ashley Morris (photo by Maitri, via Flickr).

Panelists at the first Rising Tide conference, in 2006, which brought together bloggers and other tech-savvy citizens to discuss the role of the Internet in the rebuilding and future of New Orleans. From left: Dedra Johnson, name forgotten, Greg Peters, Scout Prime, and Ashley Morris (photo by Maitri, via Flickr).

The University of New Orleans Press—in collaboration with editor, journalist, and former New Orleanian Cynthia Joyce—is seeking recommendations for content to include in a new anthology of some of the best Hurrican Katrina-related blogging and online writing.

“If you wrote, or remember reading, blogs/posts that should not be missed—because they crystallized the particular challenges of post-Katrina life, or maybe even inspired action for addressing them—I want to hear from you,” Joyce said.

The anthology will focus on online-only entries that were written between August 2005-August 2007 and revealed a layer of post-Katrina life that wasn’t typically picked up by traditional news outlets.

There will also be a section, “PLEASE FORWARD,” that will contain some of the emails and missives that may not have had a permanent web address but were repeatedly passed around via group email lists in an effort to fill the information void. Joyce is looking for submissions for this section as well.

The book’s official description:

“A collection of writing never before published in print—and in some cases no longer accessible online—the anthology will highlight the unprecedented role blogging played post-Katrina, both as a critical news source in the days and weeks immediately following the storm, and as a catalyst for the region’s recovery in the months and years that followed.”

Email submissions, suggestions, and/or questions to [email protected].

This article was reposted from Press Street: Room 220, a NolaVie content partner.