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Deborah Cox stars in The Bodyguard the Musical

The Bodyguard

The Bodyguard (Photo of UK Cast by Paul Coltas)

My love for the great Whitney Houston is long-standing. I am not ashamed to admit that I sang “One Moment in Time” at my 7th grade graduation. (Yes, I did feel eternity.) By 9th grade, my girlfriends and I would listen to The Bodyguard soundtrack for hours, swooning over our latest crushes and singing at the top of our lungs. (Yes, we nailed the key change.) At three months old, “I’m Every Woman” was my daughter’s favorite song. (Yes, she “ohh’s” as my background singer.) Needless to say, my expectations for The Bodyguard the Musical were as high as my love for Whitney runs deep. I am thrilled to report that the show did not disappoint.

The show itself was worthwhile: The dancing was fun and upbeat, the sets visually appealing, and there was at least one hairstyle that paid homage to the show’s ‘90s roots. Can you say, Jessie Spano?! But you don’t go to The Bodyguard the Musical for the sets. You go for the songs.

The problem with Whitney Houston songs is that, besides me at age 13, no one can sing like Whitney. Her voice has always been unparalleled in both range and tone. I used to cringe every time someone else, even other Grammy award-winners, would attempt to cover a Whitney tune. That is, until Tuesday night at the Saenger Theatre. I will never get to see Whitney Houston live in concert, but Deborah Cox playing Rachel Marron is the next best thing.

The writers and producers of the show must have anticipated that diehard Whitney fans would flock to auditorium. Unlike other film to stage adaptations, there was no random filler music that would be unfamiliar to fans. Instead, they rounded out the soundtrack with additional Whitney Houston hits that were not from the original movie. My only complaint was that my 2-year-old daughter couldn’t be there with me for the “I Wanna Dance with Somebody” encore.

The Bodyguard the Musical is only here until Sunday, April 9, 2017. Because of the nearly non-stop singing for the female lead, Deborah Cox does not sing at every performance. Check here to make sure you don’t miss out.

 

 

 

Kim Frusciante is an educator, Tulane alumna, and new mom who loves all things New Orleans. Though she wishes she could claim to be a native New Orleanian, she will happily settle for raising one instead. Kim is passionate about enjoying the culture of our city with her daughter, Edith, and helping others to do the same with their little ones. Let Edith be your test-baby: Email Kim at kim@nolavie.com. Follow Kim (well, Edith…) on Instagram @feedithnola.