Author Archives: Sharon Litwin

About Sharon Litwin

Sharon Litwin, president and co-founder of NolaVie, has extensive non-profit experience in the New Orleans community. For 12 years, she served the musicians of the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra (LPO), the only musician-owned, collaboratively managed fulltime symphony orchestra in America, first as Executive Director and then as Senior Vice President. Prior to that, she served for 12 years as an Assistant Director of the New Orleans Museum of Art, where she directed a $27 million expansion project, built up numerous membership groups, and created long-term relationships with funders both locally and nationally. She also worked at The Times-Picayune as a feature writer and with WYES-TV, Public Television in New Orleans as Executive Producer. Sharon writes Culture Watch every Thursday for NolaVie, and her online interviews with movers and shakers in the cultural community are produced on air as Notes From New Orleans on WWNO public radio, the local NPR affliliate. Email her at Sharon@nolavie.com.

Stepping back in time on Royal Street

Editor's Note: In honor and memory of Sharon Litwin, The Queen here at NolaVie, we will be publishing a piece from her every day for the next month. Sharon was an advocate and spokeswoman for arts, culture, people, and policies ... Read More »

From Charlie Brown to the cha-cha

Editor's Note: In honor and memory of Sharon Litwin, The Queen here at NolaVie, we will be publishing a piece from her every day for the next month. Sharon was an advocate and spokeswoman for arts, culture, people, and policies ... Read More »

A summer jazz camp for grown-ups

Editor's Note: In honor and memory of Sharon Litwin, The Queen here at NolaVie, we will be publishing a piece from her every day for the next month. Sharon was an advocate and spokeswoman for arts, culture, people, and policies ... Read More »

From funk to fabulous: One artist's journey

What transformed Mignon Faget, now one of the South’s great jewelry designers, into an entrepreneur? It was the step from creating slightly funky but popular hippie-age clothing to the recognition that she could make a much better living with her precious metal jewelry. Read More »

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